Category: Food, snacks and beverages

First popular instant coffee

17sep27nescafeUK

Image: 1939 UK ad in unspecified magazine from https://www.gracesguide.co.uk .

Nescafé was rolled out in UK and USA. It was first available in Europe a few years earlier. We couldn’t find a 1939 era U.S. ad.

Various kinds of instant coffee were developed as long ago as 1771. The process developed to make Nescafé in the late ’30s became widely popular because of taste improvement. Learn more at http://www.historyofcoffee.net/coffee-history/instant-coffee-history/ .

See more about Nescafé here: http://www.nestle.com/investors/brand-focus/nescafe-focus .

Pepsi-Cola

17sep11pepsi

Image: detail of a Pepsi-Cola brochure from http://www.vintagevending.com/pepsi-cola-brochure-at-retroplanet .

In 1939 Pepsi-Cola began using the “Twice as Much for a Nickel” slogan.*

“Walter S. Mack… used a court fight and an incessant radio jingle to transform the little-known Pepsi-Cola Co. into one of the nation’s two largest-selling soft-drink makers…

“Mack became Pepsi’s president in 1938, when the company was spun off from a New York candy maker, Loft’s Inc. At that time, Pepsi was selling a syrup developed by a North Carolina druggist at the turn of the century. But Pepsi made little headway against Coca-Cola until Mack took away Coke’s control of the name “cola” in a historic court battle.”

Excerpts from the 1990 obituary of Mack in the Los Angeles Times newspaper: http://articles.latimes.com/1990-03-19/news/mn-579_1_pepsi-syrup .

 

An article about a Pepsi-Cola bottler promising to open in Santa Ana appeared in the Santa Ana Register newspaper on September 16, 1939.

* from https://www.slideshare.net/christinaamalan/pepsi-advertising-strategy . Click on the link to learn more about the company’s advertising strategy.

Acme beer

17jul14acme

Image: 1940 Petty art

“In 1939 Acme commissioned George Petty (who had just left Esquire magazine) to paint three lithesome gals which were used for the 1940, ’41, and ’43 campaigns. These images were utilized in a number of different formats. They produced a 26″ and a 33″ wide, framed image for wall hanging; a 12″ wide, framed version on an easel for back-bar display; and a cutout window card that was 42″ long and easel mounted for window displays.”

Acme Breweries was a Los Angeles company.

Excerpt and image from http://brewerygems.com/acme.htm . Click on the link to learn more.